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Namecheap DDoS Attack Impacts Free DNS and Default v2 Nameservers

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After a DDoS attack estimated at over 100Gbps web host Namecheap has fully restored service. The attack began Thursday morning around 11:00 EST, and its resolution was announced by the company shortly after 4:00 EST Friday morning.

The attack began with bombardment of around 300 domains on Namecheap’s DNS platform. Namecheap says its DNS platform is fully redundant, and spread over 5 countries on 3 continents, and that it blocks DNS attacks without service disruptions “on an almost-daily basis.”

Namecheap quickly posted notice of the disruption to a blog on its website, and continued updating it throughout the attack and its aftermath. At 9:50pm EST the attack was declared over and CEO Richard Kirkendall and VP Matt Russell posted a breakdown of the attack.

“The sheer size of the attack overwhelmed many of our DNS servers resulting in inaccessibility and sluggish performance,” they said. “Our initial estimates show the attack size to be over 100Gbps, making this one of the largest attacks anyone has seen or dealt with. And this is a new type of attack, one that we and our hardware and network partners had not encountered before.”

Details were not provided about the nature of the “new type of attack.”

Almost 12 hours later Namecheap reported that: “Unfortunately, most of our Free DNS and Default v2 nameservers are under DDoS attack.” The final update announcing fully restored service was posted less than an hour later.

Numerous studies have noted the steep escalation of DDoS attacks, and the hosting and cybersecurity industries are responding with a number of innovations, partnerships, and investments to maintain service.

Large-scale DDoS attacks have become more common as hackers make use of large hosting providers and mobile apps to grow ever larger attack networks.

Last week CloudFlare reported it was hit with an NTP amplification DDoS attack which peaked at almost 400Gbps, which would make it the largest attack ever.

Namecheap added OX App Suite from Open-Xchange as “Cloud Email Hosting” last month.

About the Author

Chris Burt is a WHIR contributor and writer of both fiction and non-fiction. He can be found on Twitter @afakechrisburt.

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