The House of Representatives passed the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act on Thursday in a 288-127 vote

House Passes CISPA in 288-127 Vote

Add Your Comments

The House of Representatives passed the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act on Thursday in a 288-127 vote despite warnings from Barack Obama’s senior advisers that the president would veto the controversial legislation.

CISPA received support from 92 Democrats, according to a report by Guardian.co.uk, and will now move to the Senate for a vote.

On Tuesday, senior advisers to Obama said they would recommend he veto the bill as it currently stands as the administration is concerned that the bill does not have adequate privacy protection for American citizens.

CISPA was re-introduced this year to allow private companies in the US to share cybersecurity information with federal agencies in order to protect vital US infrastructure. It overrules all existing federal and state laws, making it especially controversial. Despite the missing privacy provisions, CISPA has gained more support this year than last year, when it passed the House but died in the Senate, according to a report by CNET.

“The goal of CISPA is to increase security online and make it easier to identify potential cyber threats, but such reform must be tackled in an open manner that preserves certain civil liberties guaranteed to all Americans,” David Snead, Internet attorney and co-founder of the Internet Infrastructure Coalition said in a blog post.

CISPA allows federal agencies to conduct warrantless searches of information they obtain from email and Internet providers, CNET says, and there is no requirement that private sector firms remove personal information before sharing it with the federal government.

There are many Internet companies and web hosts that have come out against the bill, including Gandi.net, Namecheap, and ServInt. The companies and organizations listed on the website Save Your Privacy Policy have all publicly opposed CISPA. They are rallying to ensure Twitter, Google and Facebook join the list.

Talk back: Do you think CISPA will pass the Senate based on the lack of privacy provisions? What is your stance on CISPA? Let us know in a comment.

Add Your Comments

  • (will not be published)