According to Dropbox, SSO works to let users sign in once to a central identity provider, like Active Directory, and securely access all their business apps like Dropbox

Dropbox for Business Adds Single Sign On for Secure Access

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Cloud storage provider Dropbox announced on Wednesday that it has rebranded its Dropbox for Teams to better represent its business use, simply renaming it Dropbox for Business, and will introduce single sign on next month.

According to Dropbox, SSO works to let users sign in once to a central identity provider, like Active Directory, and securely access all their business apps like Dropbox. Businesses can put their existing identity provider in charge of the authentication process.

With SSO, once users are logged in to their system, they don’t need to sign in to Dropbox separately, which means one less password to remember.

SSO will be available with Dropbox for Business next month through partners including Ping Identity, Okta, OneLogic, Centrify and Symplified. Dropbox uses the industry standard Security Assertion Markup Language so it integrates easily with any large identity provider companies may use that also support SAML.

According to Dropbox, its rebranding of Dropbox for Teams comes as Dropbox is in use at 95 percent of the Fortune 500, and more than 2 million businesses.

The rebrand follows the news that Yahoo has integrated Dropbox cloud storage to make it easier for users to send large file attachments as Dropbox files.

While the partnership with Yahoo was clearly a development on the personal use of its cloud storage platform, Dropbox has recognized the opportunity in capturing the corporate audience as well. With BYOD challenging business security, offering a Dropbox for Business version with single sign-on signals an effort on Dropbox’s part in capturing more business data. Still, Dropbox for Business doesn’t offer encryption, which has many users concerned about using the cloud storage solution for sensitive documents. Highlighting security features in a cloud storage offering is a good way for cloud providers to differentiate from Dropbox.

Last year, Dropbox investigated allegations of a potential security breach after users complained of receiving spam to email addresses they used exclusively to sign up for a Dropbox account. 

Talk back: What do you think of Dropbox’s focus on capturing business customers? Do you think of Dropbox as competition for your own cloud storage service? Let us know in a comment.

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