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CloudFlare Project Galileo Protects Journalists, Political Organizations and Artistic Freedom Online for Free

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CloudFlare announced Project Galileo on Thursday, a program designed to create a better internet through protection of free expression online. The San Francisco-based company provides DDoS protection and acceleration services, regardless of platform.

CloudFlare says political and artistically important sites have received an increasing number of large denial of service attacks over the last couple of years. A recent example is an attack on NationBuilder sites, a company that provides web hosting and other services for political organizations.

“CloudFlare’s mission is to build a better Internet,” CloudFlare founder Matthew Prince said in a blog post. “Fundamental to that is ensuring that bullies cannot use attacks to censor content simply because they disagree with it. We knew we needed to do something to stop this troubling trend. To that end, today we’re announcing Project Galileo.”

State-of-the-art DDoS mitigation technology will be offered by Project Galileo to any organization or journalist against attacks that might censor their work. CloudFlare will give full protection to make sure the site stays online regardless of content or location.

According to the Project Galileo website, “CloudFlare is partnering with respected free speech, public interest, and civil society organizations to help us to identify websites that qualify for participation in Project Galileo.” Current partners include Free Press, Center for Democracy and Technology, Mozilla and Committee to Protect Journalists, among others.

“As we invite sites into Project Galileo, it is important that we remain content neutral. We believe that CloudFlare should never decide, based on their content, what sites deserve protection. We’re very good at technology, but deciding what content is politically or artistically important is above our pay grade,” Prince said.

“As such, we’ve partnered with a number of civil society organizations to identify at-risk sites that qualify for Project Galileo.”

The partner organizations will sponsor organizations and entities that meet the criteria for participation. Among the types of public interest web properties that might qualify are minority rights, journalists, media outlets and entities that generally act in the public interest.

About the Author

Cheryl Kemp is the Content Director for the WHIR and HostingCon. At the WHIR she is responsible for writing and developing content, managing social media communities, and photography and videography. At HostingCon she is responsible for recruiting and coordinating advisory boards, as well as managing the conference program development process and speaker selection. She attended the University of Cincinnati and holds a degree in Psychology. You can find her on twitter and google+.

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