Based on the OnApp CDN software, CDNify aims to serve the gap in the market left by traditional CDNs, which are typically designed for enterprise and corporate customers

CDNify Launches to Serve Startup Content Delivery Needs

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CDNify launched its CDN service and company on Monday to simplify content delivery for startups and developers.

Based on the OnApp CDN software, CDNify aims to serve the gap in the market left by traditional CDNs, which are typically designed for enterprise and corporate customers. Until recently, there was not a simple solution for startups and developers to purchase CDN and spin the services up quickly.

“The way we came about building the CDN was a couple of years ago we built a product that became very popular very quickly and we had issues scaling it,” CDNify founder James Mulvany tells the WHIR. “We had a lot of traffic to our server, we went from zero to a 180 million hits in the space of a month and our server was grinding to a halt every day. We started looking at CDNS and we discovered very quickly that a lot of the CDNs out there are targeted towards corporate or enterprise-level. As a small company we had to spend ages on the phone going through all these sale processes and being sent these whitepaper reports. There was no real easy way for us to get set up quickly. All we wanted to do was sign up, put our card number in and get started.”

Simplicity is what CDNify says sets their CDN apart from competitors, including OnApp’s own user customizable CDN service, CDN.net. 

“We’re going after a slightly different market [than OnApp], and we’ve got our backend control panel, which in my opinion looks nicer than theirs,” Mulvany says. “They’ve gone for user customizable and the pricing will vary depending on what you select, while we’ve just gone for a single price point to make it simple for companies and individuals looking to get started, so they know exactly what they’re spending.”

While early adopters can sign up for CDNify for free during its first two weeks, after that CDNify is charging based on blocks of bandwidth, starting at $29 for 500GB. Customers can purchase blocks up to 10TB. The blocks of bandwidth expire after one year.

In addition to simplicity, CDNify hopes to offer education to startups who may not even realize their app or service could benefit from the use of CDN.

“We have a lot of friends that are running startups in the UK, London and Berlin, and other different places, and a lot of them aren’t aware of CDN. We have one group of friends who are actually launching a video streaming service and weren’t aware of CDNs,” CDNify chief marketing officer Mike Cunsolo says.

“A lot of what we’re trying to do is to position ourselves as a CDN for small scale tech companies, startups like ourselves, and developers. I think one of the things when we realized we needed a CDN was that it was very limiting to get into that space. I think part of what will make us unique as well is helping people understand why they need a CDN and helping them to get into that position.”

Though CDNify tells the WHIR that there are no concrete plans as of yet to resell its CDN services through web hosting partners, Mulvany says it is “keen to have a whitelabel service further down the line.”

“We want to try to add as much value as possible,” Mulvany says.

 

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2 Comments

  1. This is great news although I wish some CDNS would get a pop in some African countries like South Africa

    Reply
    • Hi Fred. If you need a CDN provider with South African POP, go to CDNlion.com and test it out. We also have more 'exotic' locations other than Africa.

      Reply